Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

5 thoughts on “4K Blu-ray Announced at IFA in Berlin

  • September 6, 2014 at 12:50 pm
    Permalink

    HI again Mark. I was one of the lucky few that were invited by Dolby to NYC for a demo of their Atmos at Home system. It worked very well and will be a nice addition to any home theater, whether you use in ceiling speakers or chose to go the upfiring versions that much to my surprise worked very well, although in our demo, not as well as the in ceiling speakers. That could just have been the result of the positioning of the speakers modules which were prototypes from an unnamed manufacturer. While any blu-ray player will send out the Atmos signal, you will need a new AVR or processor to decode it. I believe some of the new Onkyo AVRs will work with a firmware upgrade. With OLEDs finally arriving on the screen, HT is a very exciting hobby.

    Reply
    • September 6, 2014 at 12:55 pm
      Permalink

      Although I couldn’t talk about it at the time, I also traveled to the Dolby facilities in Burbank about a year ago to experience Atmos and give my thoughts. It is quite compelling. Not sure where it will play into music, but the home theater people are going to love it.

      Reply
  • September 7, 2014 at 9:35 am
    Permalink

    Sadly a lot of people still watches DVD’s – these people are migrating into Netflix and co. sooner or later.
    Hard times to come for ‘real’ 4K and Dolby Atmos etc.
    Let’s hope that enough people will support these new standarts.

    Reply
  • September 7, 2014 at 4:45 pm
    Permalink

    I know little of Atmos, but my initial impression is that it is of great value to the production side of surround sound, since it apparently offers “object -oriented” surround channels. I don’t know exactly what that means, but I think it means in part that it’s easier to map between the number of surround channels assumed in production vs what a home consumer actually has. I think DTS has also produced a similar object-oriented surround approach (“UHD”?), but I’m more interested in your comparison of these two methods and what it means on the production vs consumer sides.

    Reply
    • September 8, 2014 at 3:41 pm
      Permalink

      I don’t work mixing films myself and although I may upgrade my facility to make Atmos mixes…it’s going to be somewhere down the line. I’ve visited studios that have the Atmos system installed and got to preview the pro and consumer system. I believe it’s a great step forward. I haven’t yet heard the DTS version. The basic gist is that mixers are moving “virtual” sounds throughout the speaker array as objects not panning specific channels to individual speakers. This means that a single mix can then be reproduced in any Atmos equipped theater regardless of the number of speakers they actually have.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

14 + eighteen =