Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

16 thoughts on “SONY PCM-601 ESD For Sale

  • November 18, 2014 at 8:44 am
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    Hi Mark,

    just wondering if the 601 is still available and if it is, where you’re located and is it a NTSC or PAL unit and 110V or 220V?

    I still have a F1 and a 501, but the 601 digital out would make it easier to get my old music tracks, recorded back in the 80’s, onto a PC for editing.

    Look forward to your reply.

    Cheers

    Greg

    Reply
    • November 18, 2014 at 8:59 am
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      It’s still available. I’m in Los Angeles so it’s NTSC and 110 volts.

      Reply
  • November 30, 2014 at 11:03 pm
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    I used to do a lot of work with PCM F1 (Actually the black Nakamichi DMP100 clone of the PCM F1) and later PCM 501 and 601ESD. I believe that the Sampling rate even in NTSC for the PCM 601ESD and 501ES units was 44.1. If you look at your manual it will list the sampling rate at 44.1 and if you look at a PCM 701, DMP100 or PCM F1 it was 44.056. At the time I remember doing digital transfers to DAT machines and reading SP/Dif from CDs I think that I digitally transferred some recordings last year with my unit into Logic and burned CD’s from those recordings without issues. I suppose you could record a 1K tone on a VHS deck, digitally dub it to Logic or pro-tools session at 44.1 and use a frequency counter from the analog output of Logic and the analog output of the PCM 601ESD and see if they both read 1KHz. If the wordclock on the PCM 601 ESD is running at 44.056 when the recording is dubbed, later when the Tone is played back on the DAW (now using internal wordclock of 44.1 it will be slightly elevated in pitch. This can actually be tested without using a recording deck by just looping the Composit video out to the Composite video in on the 601 and recording the digital out onto the DAW.

    Reply
    • December 1, 2014 at 8:19 am
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      I’d have to investigate further. I do know that I had to remaster a percussion recordings because of the 44.056 kHz to 44.1 kHz difference.

      Reply
  • December 2, 2014 at 8:04 pm
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    If the original recordings were done with an F1 or 701, then playback, with SP/Dif or analog with the 601ESD would result in a pitch change. If the original recordings were done on a 501 or 601 you should be fine. My understanding is that there was a work clock change when the 501/601 was introduced. The 1610 and 1630 pro units were 44.1 and they recorded on UMatic decks with NTSC Hetrodyne color carriers, which was not much different than the beta decks that the sony PCM units were paired with.

    Reply
    • December 3, 2014 at 11:31 am
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      That’s for the update. I used an F1 for a long time at 44.056 kHz.

      Reply
  • December 17, 2014 at 8:22 am
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    I’m interested in the Sony PCM-601–is it still available? If so, how do I reach you?

    Reply
  • September 4, 2015 at 2:40 pm
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    Sept. 4, 2015 – Is your Sony PCM-601 still for sale? I’m interested.
    Thank you.

    Reply
    • September 4, 2015 at 5:53 pm
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      Sorry, I sold it ages ago.

      Reply
  • February 5, 2016 at 2:14 am
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    Hi, if anyone is still interested in a PCM601ESD, I have one I’m selling. I have inherited all of my (late) father’s hi-fi and audiophile stuff, and I’m trying to help my mother clear out a TON of equipment. Anyway, this unit will be among them.
    http://ebay.to/1PWFCX1 (goes live at 6pm PT, 01/05/2016)

    Reply
    • February 5, 2016 at 10:01 am
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      Good luck…I sold mine to a radio station in NYC.

      Reply
  • October 22, 2020 at 12:43 pm
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    I see it’s an old thread. Nevertheless I would ask you all a question and hope you will reply.

    If you had a chance to buy only one of the Sony PCM DAC which one would it be and why?

    Many consider Sony PCM-F1 sonically to be the best is that a kind of overstatement?

    Cheers

    Reply
    • October 22, 2020 at 3:22 pm
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      There are much better DACs now than when the F1 or 601 were around.

      Reply
  • October 22, 2020 at 3:38 pm
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    Is there any particular one you would recommend to a normal expense?

    Cheers

    Reply
    • October 22, 2020 at 3:42 pm
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      Schitt Audio makes great products at reasonable prices.

      Reply

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