Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

11 thoughts on “The AIX Records 2015 Sampler…Is Late!

  • January 4, 2015 at 3:38 am
    Permalink

    This sampler looks nice, but I never listen to samplers. Do you have plans to produce a new recording? I am particularly interested in not-so-well-known classical music. Or would there be a classical recording (a full opus, not a sampler with bits and pieces) that you would particularly recommend among your own or available on iTrax?

    Reply
    • January 4, 2015 at 10:12 am
      Permalink

      I find that samplers to be very effective at introducing customers to new repertoire and artists…AND most importantly to the benefits of high-resolution, purist style recording. Making new recordings is very expensive and the thought of doing a classical project is appealing but wouldn’t pay. If you want to hear some of the best orchestral recordings, you might want to check out our Bach Brandenburg DVD…he’s my favorite composer.

      Reply
    • January 4, 2015 at 11:45 am
      Permalink

      While I don’t listen to samplers, I do find samplers to be very useful in identifying albums, labels, artists and composers for further investigation.

      For classical recordings of somewhat less well known works I recommend Mark’s chamber music recordings.

      Stevens & Ives Quartet: Brahms Piano Quintet in F Minor, Op. 34
      Chamber Music Palisades: Shostakovich, Debussy & Brockman
      George Enescu Wind Quintet: Scarlatti & Beethoven
      Pro Arte Trio: Haydn Piano Trios
      Mozart: Clarinet Quintet, K.581, Horn Quintet, K.407, String Quartet, K.169

      Reply
      • January 4, 2015 at 12:07 pm
        Permalink

        Thanks for mentioning the Haydn Trios…those are some of my favorites.

        Reply
        • January 22, 2015 at 1:41 am
          Permalink

          Many thanks for all the recommendations. I’ll probably go for the Haydn Trios, because these pieces are new to me while I already own far too many recordings of the Brandenburg. On the other hand, for the Brandenburgs, I know them so well that, for the sake of appreciating the quality of the recording, it would be interested. I may end up buying both, but I’ll start with the Haydn.

          Reply
          • January 22, 2015 at 10:09 am
            Permalink

            I love both recordings and the repertoire. The Brandenburg is special because of the sound of the recording. Placing lots of stereo pairs of microphones brings an intimacy and level of detail that spacious recordings don’t have. Richard Hardbattle, a reviewer in the UK, wrote to me about his review…he told me that he’s heard hundreds of Brandenburg recordings but mine was a completely new presentation…he could hear into the orchestra.

  • January 4, 2015 at 9:54 am
    Permalink

    Depending on how the Blu-ray disk is authored you could quite easily put the tracks on-line: assuming each track had it’s own transport stream file (m2ts) with the various audio tracks multiplexed in, you could simply rip the disk and place each file as you do your normal downloads. Each m2ts file would contain the video and all sound options which the user could then choose to access in the software used for playback – VLC et al.

    I do want a copy, but I’d prefer to download.

    Reply
    • January 4, 2015 at 10:21 am
      Permalink

      The disc is a fully navigable Blu-ray title. I don’t see how you could stream 36 Mbps and view/listen to the output…and switch to the various audio streams. Tidal and Deezer are just get to the point where they can stream CD quality (1411 kbps) and MQA might get us 96 or 192 kHz/24-bit audio in a stream but I haven’t heard anyone talking about 30 plus Mbps! Even downloading a project like this would be 25 gigs…and that’s pushing it.

      Reply
      • January 4, 2015 at 1:59 pm
        Permalink

        I’m not talking about streaming, I’m talking about downloading. And yes it would be 25GB if single layer, otherwise up to 50GB dual. However I wouldn’t be interested in the classical and as I have a 100Mb connection (assuming the connection at your end can match that) I could get the lot in a few hours. More than likely I’d cherry pick, even if over a few days (especially if your connection were slow) It is an option, we are now in the 21st century and the bandwidth is there.

        Reply
        • January 5, 2015 at 9:13 am
          Permalink

          I like to think I ahead of the curve…but we only have 10 Mbps up and down here (and I thought that was pretty good). Downloads would be possible but they are only segments of about 2-3 minutes…

          Reply
  • January 4, 2015 at 3:09 pm
    Permalink

    Keep on posting how it evolves – I wan’t one!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

15 − seven =