Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

4 thoughts on “The Birth of DSD – Part II

  • November 18, 2014 at 1:13 am
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    Perhaps one of the seductions of SACD was Sony thought it was an unrippable format. DVD-A was cracked first but Sony just didn’t realise how resourceful the net is and SACD is now broken, albeit, not without some effort. It’s not hard to find FLAC files of ripped SACD’s out in the wild.

    For my part I was happy to have any HiRes format, my only slight preference being SACD for the reason that you didn’t need to have a monitor connected to play the disc. It would just play like a CD where DVD-A often required you navigate some on-screen menu which if your main system is projector connected, it a bit of a nuisance.

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    • November 18, 2014 at 8:58 am
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      Security was certainly a part of their thinking. But the major consideration was nothing but the money that they wanted from a new generation of license fees. That the way the system works. Th menu thing was a minor factor but I agree that SACD were easier to use.

      Reply
  • November 18, 2014 at 6:42 am
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    I appreciate your efforts and wish to encourage you not to give up, ever, even though sometimes telling the truth (facts) can piss off people who have their minds made up, usually with no basis in fact or reality. My friend still insists “There are no radios in my cellphone”, and gets pissy when I try to explain how the cellphone actually works. I enjoy your efforts,thank you.

    Reply
    • November 18, 2014 at 8:58 am
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      Thanks for the encouragement Roger. It’s a challenge for sure.

      Reply

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