Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

8 thoughts on “A New Leaf

  • August 14, 2014 at 12:03 pm
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    Fully understandable – go for it Mark!

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  • August 14, 2014 at 12:15 pm
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    By the way – why 2 different homepages (with practically the same content)?

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  • August 14, 2014 at 2:43 pm
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    I think it’s fine to accept ads in your case. I know that you will maintain your integrity through the process. But if I see any miracle liquids that transform MP3s into 5.1 super high resolution files, I’ll know that dementia has set in ..

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    • August 14, 2014 at 8:27 pm
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      Thanks…nice sentiment.

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  • August 14, 2014 at 9:27 pm
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    Hi Mark,

    I have to disagree a bit with you on how you understand the appropriation of your posts, quotes, graphs, etc.
    I think that the fact that other writers and websites on the web quote you, appropriate your graphs and your work is HIGHLY positive. It means your work has had a significant and powerful impact, be it with the consequences or interpretations that you expect or not.

    I would go as far as to say that the more questionbable or objectionable the appropriations of your graphs, work and quotes, the more the impact. It means the industry people who are behind the greed and disgusting attempt to legitimize their marketing fraud are feeling the heat, and that they’re not happy about your effort to educate consumers and pros alike.

    As for the intellectual property comment you make, I’m afraid I also disagree. I believe that the transparent and open way in which you have shared your invaluable knowledge, insight and sound intentions to revert publicized falsehood and criticise morally dubious business practices, is a contribution to the public. I would go as far as to write a long Wikipedia entry in your name, that resumes and offers a broad view of all the important contributions you have made through your blog. I think the entire educational, political and critical potential of your work on this blog lies in the open and public character of it. It clearly trascends copyright, as what really counts is that accurate information is publicly available and universally accessible for consumers not to be fooled, as well as to prevent people without scruples to go around spreading their ominous snake-oil.

    That said, I would second the previous comment:

    “I think it’s fine to accept ads in your case. I know that you will maintain your integrity through the process. But if I see any miracle liquids that transform MP3s into 5.1 super high resolution files, I’ll know that dementia has set in ..”

    With the greatest appreciation for your blog and your noble efforts, I would personally oppose your decision to open up for industry ads. On the other hand, I also think that there’s few blogs out there that deserve a little financial incentive to keep going.

    Cheers!

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    • August 15, 2014 at 7:09 am
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      Thanks Camilo…if i were just my articles, perhaps I would feel differently. But these web sites are “borrowing” the hard work of others and profiting from it.

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  • August 15, 2014 at 4:07 am
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    Mark, I share Stewart’s sentiment.

    Having read your daily posts for almost a year and bought several AIX disks you’ve rightly earned the status of a most credible source and contributor to the High Definition Audio debate.

    You educate and explain what is sometimes usurped with “junk science” and poke holes through it while at the same time expanding our knowledge of what is really happening to the music and sounds presented in a true high definition process in an easy to understand manner.

    You’re not alone with the dissatisfaction that many of us feel about the way music is mastered and mixed resulting in some truly horrible sounds that render the artist’s work as nasty over compressed clipped ugh that has no dynamic range and just sounds awful to the point of unlistenable.

    Thanks for the warning about the banner adds now contributing to the financial well being of the site. I’m sure we’ll get to see some interesting and “approved by Mark” product placements.

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