Dr. AIX's POSTS NEWS TECH TALK — 07 February 2017

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I know there’s been a long pause between this post and the previous one. I’ve been exceptionally busy, took a long weekend in Big Sky, Montana to ski with some close friends, started a new semester, and moved my office from the AIX studio building to my home. That’s right. I’m typing this post from my home on the west side of Los Angeles rather than my old office. It represents a major change in my daily routine and situation. I’m opening a new chapter on my life.

I started my CD premastering business, the Pacific Coast Sound Works, out of my converted garage in Chatsworth, CA in 1989. With a souped up Mac II, a Sonic Solutions DSP card, some associated peripheral equipment (DAC, PS Audio DAC, Tannoy LGM-12 Speakers), and a small list of record label clients, I launched my non-academic career. And now almost 30 years later, I’ve moved back home in another converted garage to continue my writing, engineering, consulting, and label management. I don’t really relish spending hours in the studio any more — although having access when I need it is comforting.

The catalyst was a request by one of my tenants for additional space. I relinquished my main studios to Ken Caillat and his partners about a year ago. Then the new folks at Brew Media wanted my corner office for their studio lounge, so I moved across the hall. Finally, Hear360 — the new VR/AR audio company located in the middle of the building — tied in with a postproduction company/investor from Toronto and asked if there was any space left for them. I decided I could do without the small office adjacent to their space. I’ve spent way too much time packing and unpacking, loading and unloading, disassembling and assembling furniture over the past month. Even now, my surroundings at home are less than ideal but functional.

Charlie, the family Border Collie, is lying at my feet. He loves having me around all of the time. There’s all the more chance for a walk to the park or time to chase a Frisbee. It’s barely noon and we’ve already had two walks through the rain. Mona, my wife, is less sure given the chaos that I’ve brought from the studio to the house — and the CAT-6 cable snaking its way down the hall to the Time Warner cable modem (wireless just wasn’t making to the new computer room). I’ve settled in enough to get back to working on the book, starting a new semester at the university, and polishing up a few client projects but there’s plenty of setup work remaining.

This morning I drafted a press release about Peter Otto’s (CSO of Comhear) appearance this week on Scott Wilkinson’s Home Theater Geeks podcast. He’s been invited to the Thursday 2 pm slot PST to talk about beamforming and its application to transaural sound reproduction. Peter is a very accomplished individual with skills in software, music, composition, hardware, audio engineering, and music technology. In fact, one would be hard pressed to find a more knowledgeable person in the area of advanced spatial audio delivery. He’s been the Director of Research & Development in the Sonic Arts group at UC San Diego’s CalIT2, which includes the Spatial Audio Lab (Spatlab — what a great name for a facility!). I strongly encourage everyone to check out his discussion with Scott.

I’m back in the saddle and ready to allocate my time to the numerous things on my plate. The number one focus is getting the book completed. It’s nearing the final stages — although not as quickly as I would have liked.

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About Author

Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

(13) Readers Comments

  1. Good luck! Hope your health is OK too. Looking forward to the book! Hopefully no one is nagging you about the release date, personally I would rather have it the way you want it or as close to your vision as you can get it. So what if it takes several more months. I can’t even recall what your estimated delivery date was…

    • Ron, thanks for asking. Everything is good on the thyroid cancer thing. My doctor assures me that any remaining cells are undetectable. Good news. I’m hoping the book will be done in 6-8 weeks — only a year later than the original estimate. It’s been a very big project.

  2. Will you be recording / publishing any new music? Lyn Stanley is in your neighborhood and seems to be focused on we’ll produced music. Blu Ray and SACD for one of her releases, but no hi-res downloads.

    • Sadly, my catalog is probably as big as it’s going to get. I know Lyn Stanley and think she’s a wonderful artist. But my time and resources are spent.

  3. Wireless network extender (to keep the wife happy!)

    • Yep, I was at Fry’s yesterday and looking at options.

  4. Dr. Aix,

    Best wishes in your new/old working environs, although you’ve been there before.
    Working from home allows for the shortest commutes: from the office to the kitchen or from the office to the john and back!

  5. hi mark,

    i realy like your new method of breaking up a massive paragraph into readable portions. it’s something I promote on the sites like the asylum and karma. when a massive paragraph appears, i just don’t read it.

    it’s good to hear you can slow down a bit, working from home is getting to be popular.

    ..hifitommy

  6. Good luck with the changed priorities. I know how challenging that can be. Sorry to hear that you won’t be releasing any new albums but you have already hinted that that would be the case so no real surprise there.

    I have my tickets for AXPONA so I’ll see you there in April. Best to you and your family.

  7. I hope at some point you will release more recordings. I really enjoy the ones released so far. See you at AXPONA

    • I wish I could say there’s plans to release new recordings but unfortunately there isn’t. It’s simply too expensive and I lack the personnel to pull it off once again. But I would never say never.

      • How about getting permission from that one unnamed female singer you have the album of, to release it! That one is already done. 🙂 Looking forward to perhaps hearing more samples of it at Axpona again this year!

        • I’ll see you in Chicago. I would love to release that recording but there would be no end of legal trouble.

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