Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

6 thoughts on “Streaming High-Resolution Audio…Not!

  • February 28, 2015 at 5:48 pm
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    I think the choice of “master tape” quality, rather than implying that the Masters came from analog tape, is just a reference to the original source. Terminology like this can take on a life of its own that is completely divorced from its original definition. How many of the “record albums” sold today are really a collection of 78 RPM phonograph records held in a bound book?

    As you noted, there are lots of classical labels that have been recording in better than CD quality digital for over a decade, so the content is there. My previous experience with Orastream’s Classical HD app was similar to yours, but that was streaming to an iPod Touch. Here’s hoping things will be better to my laptop over Verizon FiOS.

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    • March 1, 2015 at 12:11 pm
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      I happened across a new effort to resurrect analog tape transfers to high-resolution status at a new venture called 2xHD. I think there’s a whole lot of people that believe analog tape is the best format…even today.

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  • March 1, 2015 at 7:42 am
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    I am confused by your comments on Internet speed Mark. Are you implying that achieving an 8 Mbps download speed on a typical home Internet connection is unlikely? If so, then you are misinformed as the average global download speed, per http://www.netindex.com, is 22.1Mbps and 11.4Mbps for mobile. If you are saying that maintaining a 8Mbps stream is unlikely due to congestion or other issues that determine end to end throughput, then I understand that however it is important to be clear with your detail oriented readers.

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    • March 1, 2015 at 12:13 pm
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      Getting the necessary bandwidth for “high-resolution” streaming is going to be very difficult…even for the roughly 1/3 of households that have broadband. And it’s going to be nearly impossible for portable devices.

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  • March 1, 2015 at 10:35 am
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    I don’t think the 8 Mbps requirement is that much of a problem. The FCC definition of broadband requires at least 25 Mbps down and 3 Mbps up. 29% of US internet connections are already at least 25 Mbps down. Now whether the ClassicsOnlineHD site will be able to deliver that speed is another question.

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  • March 1, 2015 at 6:02 pm
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    Not a big issue in any case. Can’t be more than a dozen or so Classical music listeners in all of Polk County, FL

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