Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

17 thoughts on “The Info Graphic and JAS Logo Debacle

  • January 14, 2015 at 3:26 pm
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    Where should I write ?

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    • January 15, 2015 at 8:26 am
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      I would write to the people and organizations that are putting out this stuff…the CEA, the DEG, NARAS P&E Wing, MusicBiz.org etc.

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  • January 14, 2015 at 4:52 pm
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    “This is very troubling and should send every one of us running in the opposite direction.” In the words of the Eagles, I’m already gone! Unmitigated mess.

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  • January 14, 2015 at 5:46 pm
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    Mark, my maximusic Mentor, mountains of Montana might mean supplementary sources of oxygen, if pulmonary problems persist. PLEASE ask your physician. James, an anxious alumnus, Albany W.Australia

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    • January 15, 2015 at 8:32 am
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      I’ve got Pneumonia. I’m glad I went to the doctor.

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  • January 14, 2015 at 10:44 pm
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    The graphic is about the *file*. The specifications table seems to be all about *hardware*. That’s fine, we need the right hardware, but what about the audio file and its provenance? Is that being specified? If not, the whole thing can be manipulated and disguised.

    The HRA spec needs to be all about the FILE and its PROVENANCE.

    The “HRA-Ready” spec can be about hardware, as per the table, but that’s not the primary issue. The primary issue is the FILE.

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    • January 15, 2015 at 8:48 am
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      You nailed it. This whole enterprise comes down to whether the recording industry, artists, producers, labels, and engineers moved their productions towards more fidelity. Honestly, I have not seen any progress on that front.

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    • January 15, 2015 at 8:52 am
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      They’ve done these microsites in many countries. My own website iTrax is actually one of the sources for high-res audio in the US version. They get a lot of the facts wrong but that’s marketing.

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    • January 15, 2015 at 10:06 am
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      absolute deception

      Just an excerpt :

      “Then came the CD, which afforded high quality sound but with capacity limited by the physical size of the disc.”

      Then, what/who impeded Sony/Philips to implement mono instead of stereo thereby providing 44.1 kHz frequency range limit within the 700 MB CD ?..

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      • January 15, 2015 at 10:09 am
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        Mono instead of stereo…right.

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    • January 15, 2015 at 10:04 pm
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      Those graphics in the Sony microsite above, supposedly depicting the result of the sampling process and showing these stairstep curves are grossly misleading because they lead the naive reader to think that more samples per second is better since the curves become smoother while they can never be as perfect as the analogue original. They also serve to visualize what audio resolution supposedly is. This is far removed from the truth and does not depict the output of the ADA conversion chain. The term resolution itself when applied to digital audio (as if it were analogous to digital imaging which it isn’t) is also grossly misleading. The most appropriate term ‘fidelity’ has been unfortunately used and burned since the 50s. There’s no salvation.

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      • January 16, 2015 at 10:04 am
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        You’re right…the use of graphics like these do more harm than good.

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  • January 15, 2015 at 3:33 am
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    192/24 sounds more preferable over 44.1/16 at a blind testing not only because it has a better SNR but also due to a thinner layer of quantization noise within the audible range .

    DVD-A’s were very often produced to sound distinguishably louder to greatly enhance the impression of higher-definition audio .

    Dan Lavry had already pointed out the main reason why Upsampling gives an improvement {noted by many listeners} on fidelity of higher frequencies: some DAC intrinsic issue.

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    • January 15, 2015 at 2:33 pm
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      While the language is recognizably English, the real meaning (if any) is undecipherable…

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  • January 15, 2015 at 3:31 pm
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    Mark,
    sorry to hear about your pneumonia, I hope you get well soon!

    Today, for the first time I noticed their “Hi-Res Audio” in action on a commercial site: Qobuz was sending me a mail with a voucher for a free album in 48/24 (which is nice enough of them), and sure enough it sported the logo.

    I won’t complain about a free album (it was a live recording of a classical concert), but I could find any information about the recording equipment and the mastering process anywhere, but I don’t think anyone would be able to distinguish this from a CD…

    Best regards,
    Oliver

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    • January 15, 2015 at 3:42 pm
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      Thanks Oliver…I’m working through it. I’d be very interested in see a screen shot of photo of the Qobuz promotion or just a link. If you want to upload a track to the FTP site, I’ll analyze it and tell everyone the deal.

      Reply

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