Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

7 thoughts on “CES 2015: Day 1 Sessions

  • January 7, 2015 at 9:08 am
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    Best of all. Robert is recording Classical in surround ! We need classical done right !

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    • January 8, 2015 at 6:44 am
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      The companies and producers of real high-resolution audio are the ones that are making surround recordings of all genres…but they tend to be more classical and jazz than the mainstream genres. I think that’s a tragedy. Contrary to what Neil Young said regarding surround, listening to immersive surround is an incredible experience that blows stereo away. And we can do it in headphones too.

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  • January 7, 2015 at 11:49 pm
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    Hi Mark,
    I would be interested to know whether Ryan Ulyate considers “Hypnotic Eye” to be high resolution. It’s awful, as I think you have covered recently. Very Lo-Fi and the surround mix is is an example of missed opportunities.

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    • January 8, 2015 at 6:50 am
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      It’s really tough to criticize the work of Ryan Ulyate…I’ve gotten to know him and believe he’s a good engineer. I believe he’s being directed by another high profile, rock icon and doing what Tom Petty wants. The new record is not a good example of a high-resolution product and the surround mix is just a 5.1 stereo mix.

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      • January 8, 2015 at 2:18 pm
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        Just for my education, what is a ‘5.1 stereo mix’? Have you covered it in an article somewhere, Mark?

        And, have you advice on how one can identify them? You seem to have it worked out.

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        • January 8, 2015 at 9:03 pm
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          A stereo left and right mix that has been pulled slight off the front wall. Rather than use the 5.1 a new array to place elements…a stereo 5.1 mix simply takes the exact stereo mix and pan it slight to the rear speakers. Everything is the same.

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          • January 11, 2015 at 9:56 pm
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            Thanks Mark, that is informative. Do you know of any commercial examples? It’s worth knowing which is which — and I would like to try one.

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