Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

10 thoughts on “Vintage High-Resolution

  • January 5, 2015 at 12:50 pm
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    Yeah, 65 GHz / * decits {with no filter used} should be enough for LIVE sound reproduction…

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  • January 5, 2015 at 2:02 pm
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    Mark wrote: ” I can always muck up the sound later but if you don’t capture the best sound possible when the musicians are playing, you don’t get a do over.”

    True, but surely better to capture a superb set with an average recoding than an average set with a superb recording – I’m thinking Motown here.

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  • January 5, 2015 at 3:38 pm
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    Enjoy CES! I hope you have time to check out the Meridian MQA demo at the Venetian. If so, please report back your thoughts to us. I’m particularly curious if it’s a capability Oppo could add as a software/firmware upgrade or if it’s more complicated than that. Thanks!

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    • January 6, 2015 at 7:35 pm
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      I know Robert Stuart is coming by the room tomorrow for a session. I’ll try to corner him.

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  • January 6, 2015 at 4:38 am
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    hi mr Waldrep 2 articles ago you mentioned that your 2015 sampler will not be ready for the CES.unfortunately do to unforseen reasons we will not be able to attend that.We would love to have a copy of your 2014 sampler and then when 2015 is ready that too.how do we obtain a copy?thanks love your blogs.

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    • January 6, 2015 at 7:43 pm
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      THE AIX Records HD-Audio 2013 Sampler has been available for a couple of years. You can get it at the website under samplers.

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  • January 6, 2015 at 9:10 am
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    After 30 years of playing old-time Chicago blues as alternate gig, I can sum it all up neatly with Craig’s 7th Law: “If you want to make old sounds, you will have to have old gear.” Why, you ask? Because while modern amps will output countless voicings , the magic tones of the distant past were made with a singular guitar, amplifier, and set of hands that made only 1 FANTASTIC tone. In turn , the versatile modern amps can indeed make almost any sound you want, except that 1 FANTASTIC tone that the old gear makes. I recently played my aggregate 125 year old combo of slide guitar and amp for a British man whose pro guitar amp company supplies some big names. I cranked up my vintage amp and ripped off some licks for 3-5 minutes. His jaw dropped. He said, ” Crikey, I’ve never heard anything that sounds like that.” I said, Yes, and that is the ONLY sound this rig can make, but it’s dynamite.” I rest my case.

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  • January 6, 2015 at 9:22 am
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    Sorry to go on, but on your other favorite topic, Pono, I have news
    While I wait for my player, I received a lengthy message from Pono that addressed the concerns about which you have so pointedly reported. There was zero evidence of trying to obscure the truth or pull the wool….they fessed up completely as to the nature of tracks currently offered and made clear that despite comments such as you have made, they will keep moving to supplying the highest quality/resolution possible in transferring.

    A number of other topics were covered in considerate, frank fashion as well, all leading to the inescapable conclusion that Pono is a very honest technical/sociological endeavor with typical teething pains. Fair criticism is just that, but putting devil’s horns on Neil Young’s head is so far over the top it’s not funny. Why don’t you call Pono up and see how you can help? Oh, I forgot, you have your real agenda to handle.

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    • January 6, 2015 at 7:48 pm
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      Craig, you seem to enjoy the sport of bolstering Neil and his charade at every turn. I watched (and videoed) about an hour of him making stuff up about what it and what isn’t high resolution. I will spare you the details and write a thorough evaluation. I shook his hand and spoke with him very briefly and I believe he recognized me (I mentioned the Rust Never Sleeps DVD project). But he started talking about how music died when CD came on the scene and finished claiming they are high-resolution. He’s still playing a game.

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