Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

13 thoughts on “LA Phil At Disney Hall

  • November 23, 2014 at 4:09 pm
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    Not me, I see as much live stuff as I can, here in Philly as well as NYC, mostly jazz with some classical. However, I don’t have to deal with that awful LA traffic. I hate driving out there so I can understand!

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  • November 23, 2014 at 9:23 pm
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    Sounds more to me like the performance just didn’t justify the cost and hassles of attending to you.
    Although our musical tastes are very different the experience we’ve had are similar.
    I’ve walked away from concerts feeling the same on occasion, but there are nights when the emotional experience of seeing and hearing the live performance is priceless and could never be equaled at
    In 1994 I saw Pink Floyd in quad surround at Soldier’s Field in Chicago and that WAS a priceless night.
    Guess all I’m saying is if you pay $150 for a $50 performance you going to go home disappointed.

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    • November 24, 2014 at 2:22 pm
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      I wouldn’t say I was disappointed…the Saint Saëns was incredible. But I wasn’t overwhelmed by the sonics.

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  • November 24, 2014 at 12:30 am
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    How was the Saint-Saens? I am a big fan of the piece, and I would have much, much liked to hear it live under Dudamel’s baton at the Disney Concert Hall.

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    • November 24, 2014 at 2:22 pm
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      It was really amazing…a really great piece of music.

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  • November 24, 2014 at 9:26 am
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    I tend to agree with you. One of the few exceptions was Linda Edder , who performed in San Fransisco. The backup, the acoustics were incredible. My wife & I bought the Cd at the conclusion of the show. It was pleasant, but so lacking compared to the concert. Other live performances have been lesser than DVD or BluRay formats.

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    • November 24, 2014 at 2:22 pm
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      It’s a rare thing when the recordings is better than the live performance.

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  • November 24, 2014 at 2:39 pm
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    I think the last time I went to a concert I took my kids to a Rach 3 performance because 1) I like the music and 2) they both learn the piano. But I made sure we sat near the front so we could see the pianist’s hands. That was a great experience. I don’t think I would ever go a concert if I had to sit behind the orchestra, especially if there is also a soloist involved. I think a decent 5.1 system at home would be much better.

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  • November 24, 2014 at 8:09 pm
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    Funny that you mention the LA Phil, because I was just down in SoCal and saw them play a concert of Mozart’s 20th piano concerto and Beethoven’s third symphony. I was also impressed by the acoustics and I also sat in an odd place — to the left of the conductor and behind the first violins, etc, so that I could see Salonen’s face. I agree the balances were a little odd sitting beside the orchestra like that — the horns and drums were too loud.

    I also checked out the LA Phil’s gift shop, hoping to score some hi-rez multichannel Blu-rays, DVDs, or Super Audio CDs of this great orchestra, but no dice — just a bunch of CDs, mostly 15 to 30 years old! What a waste that one of the world’s greatest orchestras playing in such a wonderful-sounding hall don’t produce recordings, not even on 35-year-old CD technology, much less a modern media like Blu-ray.

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    • November 25, 2014 at 9:16 am
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      I used to be hooked into the LA Phil…but haven’t worked with them in a very long time. It might be interesting to reach out to them and see if they are planning any new projects. Unfortunately, they have their way of working and teams of engineers…so doing things a new way would most likely not happen.

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  • November 24, 2014 at 8:12 pm
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    “For sheer musical enjoyment, a live concert doesn’t do it for me anymore.”

    I totally agree. I feel much more emotionally involved when listening to a recording at home than I do watching musicians perform in public.

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    • November 25, 2014 at 9:16 am
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      It’s unfortunate that a live concert requires so much compromise.

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  • November 25, 2014 at 9:27 am
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    Going to a concert is like traveling; it used to be alot of fun but now is a pain in the butt unless it’s a personally super-beloved artist for whom any sacrifice is worth it (Rolling Stones.) The deep musical saturation that occurs at home is often diluted by the crowd, etc. The emotional hit that the live show generates is caused by feeling the physical and mental energy the performers radiate, not the music or sound itself, as it is at home.

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