Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

10 thoughts on “Put Tape Over The Meters!

  • October 16, 2014 at 2:49 pm
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    Death Magnetic really does annoy me – thankfully there are a couple of remixed versions from the guitar hero soundtrack which don’t suffer from the excessive pre mastering, “mastering”.
    Another recent album is FVEY by Shihad from New Zealand, it sounds like they used Death Magnetic as their exemplar. The worst thing is that experts have been proving for years that dynamic music sounds better and translates better across the board from radio to CD to streaming and whatever other format. Sigh.

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    • October 17, 2014 at 9:42 am
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      This trend to louder and louder recordings is very easy to do. And since the records still sell AND get nominated for Grammys…why change things?

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  • October 16, 2014 at 6:42 pm
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    The new October 14, 2014 release from Bob Seger called Ride Out is on of the flattest, dullest, recordings I have ever heard. His voice is completely distant and the rest of the backing music is as if they are in another room! Nuts! This is 2014 not 1954.

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    • October 17, 2014 at 9:43 am
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      And I’m a huge fan of Bob Seger. He played at our high school gym when he was just getting started. “East Side Story” and “Ramblin’ Gamblin’ Man”…go Bob.

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  • October 16, 2014 at 10:18 pm
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    The burying of vocals may be related to the burying of dialogue under music and sound effects in TV shows and movies. I have to bring up the center channel to.hear the dialogue.

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    • October 17, 2014 at 9:45 am
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      There are other things going on when it comes to dialog in movies and TV shows. First, make sure you’re getting everything you’re supposed to get to the right speakers. There are downmixes from 5.1 to 2.0 that don’t translate and dial normalization that can mess with the balance.

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      • October 17, 2014 at 1:01 pm
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        I’m running 5.1. Can you provide a link talking about dial normalization. I don’t recall anything like that on my receiver.

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  • October 16, 2014 at 10:26 pm
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    The mixing engineer clearly believes distortion enhances the SNR of Metallica’s, ahem, “music”. I am inclined to agree.

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  • October 17, 2014 at 4:08 am
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    If I bought a jazz recoding and found it to be heavily compressed I’d demand my money back.

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  • October 17, 2014 at 6:01 am
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    Sad and sadder
    Dear Sir, your statement has less to do with the science of audio or the search of perfection than it has to do with a social statement. We live in a society where money is the ultimate arbiter of value. Decades of upheaval may lie ahead, but as long as education prevails over obscurity, the love of music will survive the frenzy of insatiability.

    Reply

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