5 thoughts on “The Pono Explanation: Part II

  • September 18, 2014 at 9:36 am
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    The old bait ‘n’ switch.

    It will be interesting to see what this does to Young’s legacy.

    The day Pono comes out, HTC will probably start a big promotion campaign. Maybe even Apple.

    Those who live by the sword shall die by the sword. (hoping no danger comes to anyone)

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  • September 18, 2014 at 11:41 am
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    I think part of the issue with Neil Young is that it seems he genuinely does not understand many of the basic aspects of digital technology and seems immune to learning the basics from people close to him that obviously do. Just look at how he conflates sampling rate with dynamic range in the following quote extracted from an interview:

    “CC: Will Pono have an effect on the Loudness Wars or encourage less dynamic range compression?

    NY: (Long pause) Well, I don’t know. It could. To me dynamic range is king. The music decides how compressed it is. If you make a mix and you make the mix, not mastering, in the mix, that’s where you do the compression. You compress certain instruments as an effect. That’s really all you want. You want that shit to pump so that’s what you compress. Why compress what comes and goes? You don’t have to make that decision in mastering. The artist can make the decision. If they want something that pumps and grooves all the way through like ah, what the hell is the name, it’s a great great band, two guys, two guys (The Black Keys -CC), Yeah, they are great. They use a lot of compression in their mixing. They record at like 48. I’ve noticed what they do. They’ll have more to play with. They can still have that sound and have it be a 192 master with just like one area of the song, maybe the hook, or one instrument be 192, just fucking, what the hell is that! The mix is made up of these two things (sample rates). You get source stuff that is 48k, it’s not going to be higher than 48k unless you put acoustic echo on it and that echo will be at 192k. Using resolution as an effect is one of the offshoots of Pono. That’s one of the creative tools that people like the Black Keys, Kanye West, Eminem, Jay Z, LIl’ Wayne, can use. They are very creative, let them go, let them have whatever they want we just give them more.”

    I don’t think he can be educated in public. I think at a minimum it would take a very, very prominent popular artist and a similarly prominent recording engineer to privately sit down with him in a studio and with a few charts to begin his (re)education. But perhaps that’s been tried and he dismissed it all.

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    • September 18, 2014 at 11:52 am
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      Sidenote: in that same interview, Neil Young was apparently bothered by the possibility that one of his own recordings had been upsampled for distribution. He seems to be genuine about not wanting to offer music at anything other than the native resolution, and at least seems to get it that upsampling doesn’t add quality and will be misleading if an upsampled rate is not clearly identified as such. Or maybe I’m too much of an optimist.

      The interview I refer to was with Chris Connaker at computeraudiophile dot com. I think it’s one of the best interviews of Neil Young I’ve found re: Pono.

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      • September 18, 2014 at 1:19 pm
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        I read the interview…very informative.

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    • September 18, 2014 at 1:18 pm
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      I’ve written about his previously. Neil is a really terrific artist/musician. I’m a huge fan. However, you’re right…he should leave the tech stuff to people that know more about it. The whole multiple sample rate thing for “color” is ridiculous.

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