Dr. AIX

Mark Waldrep, aka Dr. AIX, has been producing and engineering music for over 40 years. He learned electronics as a teenager from his HAM radio father while learning to play the guitar. Mark received the first doctorate in music composition from UCLA in 1986 for a "binaural" electronic music composition. Other advanced degrees include an MS in computer science, an MFA/MA in music, BM in music and a BA in art. As an engineer and producer, Mark has worked on projects for the Rolling Stones, 311, Tool, KISS, Blink 182, Blues Traveler, Britney Spears, the San Francisco Symphony, The Dover Quartet, Willie Nelson, Paul Williams, The Allman Brothers, Bad Company and many more. Dr. Waldrep has been an innovator when it comes to multimedia and music. He created the first enhanced CDs in the 90s, the first DVD-Videos released in the U.S., the first web-connected DVD, the first DVD-Audio title, the first music Blu-ray disc and the first 3D Music Album. Additionally, he launched the first High Definition Music Download site in 2007 called iTrax.com. A frequency speaker at audio events, author of numerous articles, Dr. Waldrep is currently writing a book on the production and reproduction of high-end music called, "High-End Audio: A Practical Guide to Production and Playback". The book should be completed in the fall of 2013.

6 thoughts on “Music/Audio Basics in Two Hours: Part I

  • July 15, 2014 at 4:14 pm
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    Those music execs won’t absorb 10% of this info. What they need to know is that the public as a whole has figured out that MP-3 sucks, hi-res is now with us, data storage is cheap, not like I-pod days, and that the music business and the public, mass enjoyment of music has entered a new era. Don’t sell folks short; they WILL hear the difference between only 5% of their music’s content actually audibly manifesting compared to the freight train of music that is 24/96 master tape download. Good sound for the masses will do society much more good than great sound for the few. This is why hair-splitting and divisiveness has no place in this movement. Whether or it’s Pono, or AIX, or Chesky, who cares about provenance as long as it sounds demonstrably excellent and has the audio qualities associated with master tapes that are rarely found to any great degree on any CD. Critical insights are only really important if they help produce positive benefits on a large scale.

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    • July 17, 2014 at 12:01 pm
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      Craig, this is not about “hair-splitting and divisiveness”, but about providing accurate and meaningful information to potential customers.

      Reply
  • July 16, 2014 at 3:46 pm
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    The discussion of pitch seems to be confusing the concepts of pitch and pitch class. In traditional western music there are only 12 pitch classes, but each of these pitch classes is composed of many different pitches. The difference between a C0 and a C10 pitch is part of what is being captured in a high resolution recording.

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    • July 17, 2014 at 12:07 pm
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      I thought it better to leave pitch class out of the discussion…my point was to distinguish between pitch and frequency.

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  • July 20, 2014 at 4:49 am
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    Mark, why don’t you video record it and then offer it for sale?

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    • July 20, 2014 at 8:35 am
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      I’ve thinking a lot about creating a series of educational videos…it’s a bunch of work and I already have plenty of that.

      Reply

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